Companioning at a Time of Perinatal Loss: A Guide for by RN, Jane Heustis, Marcia Meyer Jenkins, Alan D. Wolfelt

By RN, Jane Heustis, Marcia Meyer Jenkins, Alan D. Wolfelt

Meant for nurses, medical professionals, midwives, social staff, chaplains, and health facility aid employees, this consultant supplies being concerned and useful recommendation for supporting households grieve safely after wasting a baby at beginning. because the particular wishes of households experiencing perinatal loss are excessive and require greater than simply the bereavement criteria in so much hospitals, this instruction manual bargains assistance and proposals for commencing up communique among caregivers and households, making a compassionate bedside setting, and supporting with mourning rituals. Encouraging continuous grief aid, those particular companioning suggestions can assist ease the soreness of this so much delicate scenario.

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Additional info for Companioning at a Time of Perinatal Loss: A Guide for Nurses, Physicians, Social Workers, Chaplains and Other Bedside Caregivers

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Some hospitals use markers on doors to alert staff. Everyone from housekeepers to medical directors needs to be unified in bereavement care. The last thing a family needs is for some well-meaning person to congratulate them on their new birth. All staff should call the family by name with each encounter and offer their willingness to help. A dad asked a support group leader, "Who was on the other end of the intercom? " Another mom said, "Even if our nurse wasn't available, my husband could always find someone to help.

Significant relationships are affected, too. Many parents report changes in their feelings about their partner because of the loss. Some say the shared loss made the relationship stronger, but some report the opposite. Jillian, a mother who lost her baby at 20 weeks, told the chaplain at a memorial service, "We were engaged to be married but then the baby died and we realized that all we had together was grief and that wasn't enough. I felt like he was always bringing me down. " Parents also report changes with friendships, especially those who have children or have never have experienced a loss.

They need informed caregivers who watch for clues of readiness and gently introduce subjects. They need guidance in making decisions such as seeing the baby, but don't need someone to make decisions for them. • "They thought of everything I never would have, like taking pictures or having my best friend come to see the baby. " Parents appreciate those caregivers who focused on creating positive memories, thinking ahead when they couldn't, and concentrating on details for them. • "I think my nurse loved my baby almost as much as I did.

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