From Alexandria to Babylon: Near Eastern Languages and by Francesca Schironi

By Francesca Schironi

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This practice was common in antiquity, and in particular at Alexandria. This would further support the idea of an Alexandrian origin of our glossary. part of it was kept by Neleus at Scepsis (and then purchased by Apellicon who brought it back to Athens) and part was sold to Ptolemy II Philadelphus (cf. Ath. 3b). According to Lord 1986, 155, the Partes Animalium and the Generatio Animalium were among Neleus’ books, whereas the Historia Animalium reached Alexandria. The epitome of Aristophanes of Byzantium seems however to have drawn from all these works, which were thus all present at Alexandria.

Inv. 100 (P), fr. 1 Words beginning with and -. None of the lemmata is fully preserved and all the explanations are lost. Hence it is impossible to say whether the glosses come from literary texts or not. Oxy. Oxy. 3329 3rd/early 4th AD Words in c -, followed by F translations (but not much preserved). 34 Rhinth. Perhaps (Cretan in fr. ), but none defined as such. 892 4th AD? Four columns of words in - followed by translations (but not much preserved). 35 No Perhaps, but none defined as such. Oxy.

West 1967, 59, suggested also the possibility that here the glosses are gathered to compare the language of some later poet with that of Homer. 20 Cf. Luppe 1967. 21 All the words appear in Hesychius except one, which is in Suidas. The treatment, however, is fuller than in Hesychius, especially for the citations. According to Hunt, the glossary shows similarities with Artemidorus’ Synagoge (cf. Sch. Ar. Vesp. 1169b). Though there may be words not explained with a quotation from comedy or deriving from literary texts, the glossary is a literary one.

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